Acupuncture Continuing Education

Dr. Di Case Studies, #2

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Case Studies

 

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Case Study
Excess wind-damp attack first treated with acupuncture

A fifty year-old male came down with stomach flu symptoms due to an external wind-damp attack. He had excess diarrhea and vomiting, abdominal pain, spasm of the extremities, and he could not eat or drink for three days. He had a red tongue with a white greasy coating, and his pulse was floating in the Lung and slippery and wiry in the Spleen position.

 

Diagnosis: Wind-damp attacks Stomach and Spleen.
Treatment plan:
To use acupuncture to stop nausea and vomiting and use herbs to treat the wind damp.
Formula: Acupuncture and Huo Xiang Zheng Qi San modification.

 

Acupuncture treatment: UB 57, UB 60 and TB 6 to stop spasm; St 36 and CV 14 to stop nausea. After the acupuncture treatment he had no more nausea and extremities spasm.

 

Herbal treatment:

Huo Xiang (Herba Agastaches seu Pogostemi) 12g.
Pei Lan (Herba Eupatorii Fortunei) 12g.
Cang Zhu (Rhizoma Actractylodis) 12g.
All the herbs above aromatically transform dampness. Huo Xiang and Cang Zhu expel wind-damp and treat stomach flu. Huo Xiang tends to move more quickly and it affects the surface. Cang Zhu penetrates the interior and expels wind-damp-bi pain. Pei Lan has light aromatic scents to break through the turbid dampness.

Da Fu Pi (Pericarpium Arecae Catechu) 9g.
Chen Pi (Pericarpium Citri Reticulatae) 10g.
Da Fu Pi and Chen Pi regulate Qi. Da Fu Pi promotes urination and is stronger to break up Qi stagnation. Chen Pi dries dampness in the Middle Jiao.

Sha Ren (Fructus Amomie) 6g.
Ban Xia (Rhizoma Pinelliae Ternatae) 9g.
Sha Ren and Ban Xia dry dampness in the Middle Jiao and descend Stomach Qi. Sha Ren is an aromatic transform dampness herb and it tends to rise to the upper body and to affect the surface. Ban Xia is stronger and heavier, going deeper in the body to dry dampness.

Bai Bian Dou (Semen Dolichoris Lablab) 12g.
Bai Bian Dou leaches out dampness to strengthen the Spleen Qi.

Pao Jiang (toasted Zingberis Officinalls Recens Rhizoma) 12g.
Bai Zhu (Rhizoma Atractylodis Macrocephalae)12g.
Pao Jiang and Bai Zhu are warming to dry the Spleen. Pao Jiao is warmer to more strongly dry the dampness and it also has a stronger moving function. Bai Zhu is stable and maintains a presence in the Blood longer.

Xu Duan (Radix Dipsaci Asperi) 10g.
Xu Duan warms the Kidney Yang and promotes Blood circulation.

Gan Cao (Radix Glycyrrhizae Uralensis) 3g.
Gan Cao harmonizes the ingredients of the formula.

 

Resolution: He took this formula a little each time to prevent the herbal tea from irritating his stomach, and he drank as much he could during the course of a day. Then he took three bags for three days and had a full recovery.

 

 

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Case Study
Acupuncture: Wind-damp-heat-toxins causing loss of consciousness

A seventy year-old female had diarrhea and vomiting for one month. Then, she became unconscious with a low-grade fever that worsened at night. During that time, she had not eaten nor had a bowel movement. Her tongue was dark red with a black dry coating, and her pulses were floating and weak in the Lung while deep, small and wiry in the Kidney.

 

Diagnosis: Wind-damp-heat-toxin attacks Stomach, Spleen and Heart.
Treatment plan:
To use acupuncture to awaken her mind and herbal medicine clear damp-heat-toxin.
Formula:
Acupuncture treatment and Ge Gen Huang Lian Jie Du Tang and Tao Hong Si Wu Tang modification.

 

Acupuncture treatment: St 36, and P6 and Du 14 were utilized to revive consciousness. She awakened and her mind was about forty percent improved after stimulating the needles. Gua Sha was done on her back about 12 times. There were many pox present on her skin and after breaking the pox open, dark blood leaked out.

 

Herbal treatment:

Ge Gen (Radix Puerariae) 12g.
Ge Gen raises the Spleen Qi up to stop diarrhea and it relaxes the muscles.

Huang Lian (Rhizoma Coptidis) 12g.
Jin Yin Hua (Flos Lonicerae Japonicae) 15g.
Huang Lian and Jin Yin Hua clear damp-heat-toxins from the Middle Jiao to stop diarrhea. Huang Lian is stronger and it clears Heart fire while Jin Yin Hua acts on the surface.

Sha Ren (Fructus Amomie) 12g.
Ban Xia (Rhizoma Pinelliae Ternatae) 9g.
Sha Ren and Ban Xia dry dampness in the Middle Jiao and descend Stomach Qi. Sha Ren tends to have faster action to break through the phlegm. Ban Xia is stronger and more stable, staying active in the body longer to dry the phlegm.

Tao Ren (Semen Persicae) 12g.
Hong Hua (Flos Carthami Tinctorii) 10g.
Tao Ren and Hong Hua promote Blood circulation and break up congealed Blood. Tao Ren is stable and stays in the Blood longer. It also moistens dryness. Hong Hua more quickly breaks through stagnant Blood.

Huang Qi (Radix Astragali Membranaceus) 12g.
Dang Shen (Radix Codonopsitis Pilosulae) 12g.
Huang Qi and Dang Shen strengthen the Qi. Huang Qi raises the Qi and Dang Shen is more powerful at supplementing the Spleen qi.

Sheng Di Huang (Radix Rehmanniae Glutinosae) 10g.
Mu Dan Pi (Cortex Moutan Radicis) 9g
Sheng Di Huang and Mu Dan Pi cool heat in the blood. Sheng Di Huang nourishes the Blood, Jing and Yin. Mu Dan Pi promotes Blood circulation.

Gan Cao (Radix Glycyrrhizae Uralensis) 3g.
Gan Cao harmonizes the ingredients' actions in the formula.

 

Resolution:
She took one bag and her consciousness was revived. The fever abated as did the diarrhea and she continued taking the same formula for three days after which time all her symptoms resolved. She was then prescribed a Shi Quan Da Bu Tang modification for her Qi and Blood.

 

Case Study
LU5 Acupuncture for Acute Stomach Flu Prior to Herbs

A fifteen year-old girl caught a flu and had excess diarrhea, vomiting, and pain in the abdomen. She had not been able to drink or eat for days. She had a pale tongue with a moist white coating, and her pulse was floating in the Lung position while deep and slow in both the Spleen and Kidneys.

 

Diagnosis: Wind-damp attack of Stomach and Spleen.
Treatment plan:
To stop vomiting and clear wind-damp.
Formula:
Bleeding and acupuncture treatment and Huo Xiao Zheng Qi San modification.

 

Acupuncture treatment: Bleeding technique on Lu 5, with acupuncture on St 36 and CV 14. She stopped vomiting for a while.

 

Herbal treatment:
Huo Xiang (Herba Agastaches seu Pogostemi) 12g.
Cang Zhu (Rhizoma Actractylodis) 9g.
Su Ye (Folium Perillae Frutescentis) 12g.
All the herbs above expel wind-damp to treat stomach flu. Huo Xiang is the strongest in its ability to release wind-damp. Cang Zhu tends to penetrate through the dampness and expel wind-damp-bi pain. Su Ye is physically lightweight to float up to the surface and to descend the Stomach Qi.

Pao Jiang (toasted Zingberis Officinalls Recens Rhizoma) 12g.
Rou Gui (Cortex Cinnamomi Cassiae) 3g.
Pao Jiang and Rou Gui warm the Middle Jiao and Kidney Yang. Pao Jiang maintains a presence in the Blood longer. Rou Gui flows to the surface and through the channels and guides the fire back to the source.

Bai Zhi (Radix Angelicae Dahuricae) 9g.
Bai Zhi expels wind and damp to dry Upper and Middle Jiao dampness.

Chen Pi (Pericarpium Citri Reticulatae) 3g.
Ban Xia (Rhizoma Pinelliae Ternatae) 9g.
Chen Pi and Ban Xia are paired herbs to dry dampness and regulate Qi. Chen Pi regulates Qi and tends to treat the surface. Ban Xia stays in the Blood longer and is denser in composition making it powerful in its ability to dry damp and descend Stomach Qi.

Xiang Fu (Rhizome Cyperi Rotunda) 6g.
Xiang Fu promotes Blood circulation, regulates Qi and stops pain.

Hou Po (Cortex Magnoliae Officinalis) 9g.
Hou Po regulates Qi and dries phlegm.

Da Fu Pi (Pericarpium Arecae Catechu) 12g.
Fu Ling (Sclerotium Poriae Cocoa) 15g.
Da Fu Pi and Fu Ling promote urination. Da Fu Pi regulates and breaks up Qi stagnation. Fu Ling harmonizes the water balance.

Gan Cao (Radix Glycyrrhizae Uralensis) 3g.
Gan Cao harmonizes the ingredients in the formula.

 

Resolution: She took the herbal tea a little bit each time to prevent it from causing nausea and she managed to finish two cups during a day. Afterwards, she took one bag per day. The diarrhea, vomiting and pain disappeared. She continued the same the formula one more day to ensure the pathogen was expelled completely.

 

Case Study
Chest phlegm stagnation and near loss of consciousness

A twenty-three year-old female felt nauseous and felt the need to defecate, but was unable to have a bowel movement or vomit. She had spasms with pain in the intestines, cold hands and feet, cold sweat, pale face, irritability, and was close to fainting. Her tongue was purple with a greasy thick white coating and her pulses were deep and wiry.

 

Diagnosis: Turbid phlegm stagnation in the Middle Jiao.
Treatment plan:
To eliminate excess phlegm stagnation.
Formula:
Acupuncture treatment, Yan Tang Tan Tu Fang and Huo Xiang Zheng Qi San modification.

 

Acupuncture treatment: Bleeding technique on Lu 5 and UB 40. After the acupuncture treatment she had less abdominal pain.

 

Herbal treatment:

Yan (Salt) 120g
Yan causes vomiting and has to be used in large dosages.

Resolution: After she drank the full cup of salt, she had intense vomiting and diarrhea but no more irritability or fainting feeling. She was given Huo Xiang Zheng Qi San to aromatically transform the Middle Jiao dampness.

Herbal Treatment:

Huo Xiang (Herba Agastaches seu Pogostemi)15g.
Cang Zhu (Rhizoma Actractylodis) 12g.
Huo Xiang and Cang Zhu expel wind-damp. Huo Xiang is stronger at releasing the surface and Cang Zhu penetrates deeper to treat damp stagnation.

Hou Po (Cortex Magnoliae Officinalis) 10g.
Hou Po dissolves phlegm and breaks up Qi stagnation.

Chen Pi (Pericarpium Citri Reticulatae) 6g.
Sha Ren (Fructus Amomie) 10g.
Ban Xiao (Rhizoma Pinelliae Ternatae) 10g.
Chen Pi, Sha Ren and Ban Xia dry phlegm and descend Stomach Qi. Chen Pi is mild and regulates Qi. Sha Ren is aromatic and it transforms dampness. Ban Xia is heavy and its density guides it deeper into the body to dry phlegm.

Fu Ling (Sclerotium Poriae Cocoa) 15g.
Fu Ling promotes urination to drain dampness from the Middle Jiao.

Gan Cao (Radix Glycyrrhizae Uralensis) 3g.
Gan Cao harmonizes the ingredients in the formula.

 

Resolution: She took one bag for two days and recovered

 

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